WBAunofficial

Full Version: Homelessness in Brum
You're currently viewing a stripped down version of our content. View the full version with proper formatting.
Pages: 1 2
Homelessness has risen 40% since 2010 (no doubt Proth will produce a graph showing how it is down since people lived in caves so I should stop looking at it negatively) but the last couple of times i've been out in Brum in bars near New Street and John Bright Street the issue seems to be near epedemic. Was approached for money at least 20 times in 2 hours, including people coming into pubs and going from table to table.

Was with a friend last night who hadnt beem back for a few years and she couldnt believe how bad the problem had got. 

No easy solution but a real sign of the decay that surrounds us.
I noticed this in London when I was over in May. The weather was nice so we were outside a pub having a drink and probably got approached a dozen times in an hour including one guy who was abusing everyone for not paying him respect. Never seen that much even in London, surprised a lot a of the Slovaks I went over with
Don't worry lads, when you've got your country back there'll be no homeless any more as all the immigrants won't be taking up the housing eh?
(08-02-2017, 09:01 PM)Heath Wrote: [ -> ]Homelessness has risen 40% since 2010 (no doubt Proth will produce a graph showing how it is down since people lived in caves so I should stop looking at it negatively) but the last couple of times i've been out in Brum in bars near New Street and John Bright Street the issue seems to be near epedemic. Was approached for money at least 20 times in 2 hours, including people coming into pubs and going from table to table.

Was with a friend last night who hadnt beem back for a few years and she couldnt believe how bad the problem had got. 

No easy solution but a real sign of the decay that surrounds us.

Des reses for the 2020's 

[Image: rock-houses.jpg]
(08-02-2017, 11:16 PM)JNZoltanger Wrote: [ -> ]
(08-02-2017, 09:01 PM)Heath Wrote: [ -> ]Homelessness has risen 40% since 2010 (no doubt Proth will produce a graph showing how it is down since people lived in caves so I should stop looking at it negatively) but the last couple of times i've been out in Brum in bars near New Street and John Bright Street the issue seems to be near epedemic. Was approached for money at least 20 times in 2 hours, including people coming into pubs and going from table to table.

Was with a friend last night who hadnt beem back for a few years and she couldnt believe how bad the problem had got. 

No easy solution but a real sign of the decay that surrounds us.

Des reses for the 2020's 

[Image: rock-houses.jpg]

Already snapped up by Russian oligarchs
I don't dispute that homelessness is a problem. One of my business partners is a volunteer on the board of a hostel in the Midlands, he suggested to me quite often that street homelessness is caused by individuals being banned from hostels for criminal behaviour, violence or drug taking. How you deal with the multiplicity of problems without a roof over your head I'll never know. But how you can get a roof over your head if you have a multiplicity of problems that lead you to be banned from getting a roof over your head?

I seems to me that the problem has increased as the provision of secure accommodation for the mentally ill has decreased.
I imagine you try and address the root causes of their criminality which will be drugs, drink and mental health issues. You then try via the state to try and do something about these problems with the help of local charities who feel confident that they have the means to actually make a difference, and not just spend most of their time looking over their shoulder at when the next cuts are going to hit them.
Whilst certainly far from the only problem, synthetic cannabis is also creating/exacerbating massive mental health issues. Has a different kind of impact to drugs like heroin and is cheap and very difficult to prevent.

(08-03-2017, 04:58 PM)Protheroe Wrote: [ -> ]I don't dispute that homelessness is a problem. One of my business partners is a volunteer on the board of a hostel in the Midlands, he suggested to me quite often that street homelessness is caused by individuals being banned from hostels for criminal behaviour, violence or drug taking. How you deal with the multiplicity of problems without a roof over your head I'll never know. But how you can get a roof over your head if you have a multiplicity of problems that lead you to be banned from getting a roof over your head?

I seems to me that the problem has increased as the provision of secure accommodation for the mentally ill has decreased.

The issue of people becoming rejected across the piece is certainly bad (firesetters in particular), however those issues have always been present so can only be part explanation. Mental health services certainly play a big role. Aside from the obvious concern for the individuals in these positions I couldnt help but think of the impression it wouldve left of Birmingham if I was a first time visitor. Smack bang in the centre as well, not even off on the side streets.
(08-03-2017, 05:15 PM)Derek Hardballs Wrote: [ -> ]I imagine you try and address the root causes of their criminality which will be drugs, drink and mental health issues.

I can't imagine how you do that in a non-institutional setting though.

(08-03-2017, 05:39 PM)Heath Wrote: [ -> ]Aside from the obvious concern for the individuals in these positions I couldnt help but think of the impression it wouldve left of Birmingham if I was a first time visitor. Smack bang in the centre as well, not even off on the side streets.

I agree. Someone ought to take John Clancy to task over it.
Perhaps offering the young people the opportunities at an early age to do something positive with their lives and not just turn to drugs as a way out of their meaningless existence. It will need money to be spent, but a drop in the ocean compared to the cost of dealing with the criminality that follows on from drug addiction. Another idea would be to turn over any premises vacant for more than 12months to housing associations who could then provide cheap housing for the homeless.
Pages: 1 2