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Rejoice: The Rich Are Getting Richer
#1
But not nearly as fast as the poor are.

Disposable household income of the poorest fifth of households is now £1,800 (15%) above the pre-downturn level, whilst the income of the richest fith is only £200 (0.4%) above.

Evil bloody Tories eh?
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#2
Fake news. Shy
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#3
(01-11-2018, 12:58 PM)Protheroe Wrote: But not nearly as fast as the poor are.

Disposable household income of the poorest fifth of households is now £1,800 (15%) above the pre-downturn level, whilst the income of the richest fith is only £200 (0.4%) above.

Evil bloody Tories eh?

Tax allowance is probably the contributing factor to this, showing how good a policy it is. I think you should be giving at least some of the credit to the party who had it in their 2010 manifesto mate.
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#4
http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2258

It is amazing how all the progress on infant mortality rate linked to poverty in the UK has stalled, in fact is in reverse, when things are so joyous for the poor.

I wonder why that might be?
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#5
Meanwhile the 2016 overall growth in DHI in the UK is pretty poor in comparison to most other OECD countries: https://data.oecd.org/hha/household-disp...income.htm
Proth's figures presumably come from here: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationa...ending2017

Proth's figures are interesting, thought-provoking, and, ultimately counter-intuitive, especially given the rise in the stock market and in the property market. As a guess, either the figures are skewed due to the richest-fifth (and especially the richest among the richest-fifth) seeking tax efficiency schemes that reduce personal income by using investment vehicles (and thus measurable HDI), or the rich are being mis-governed by the rich. In the latter case, richies could perhaps consider putting the Conservative Party's traditional role out to tender/privatise in order to gain a more "efficient" government.
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#6
(01-13-2018, 10:36 AM)Pneumann Wrote: Proth's figures are interesting, thought-provoking, and, ultimately counter-intuitive, especially given the rise in the stock market and in the property market.

Because they measure income, not wealth FFS sake.

(01-12-2018, 07:16 PM)Heath Wrote: http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2258

It is amazing how all the progress on infant mortality rate linked to poverty in the UK has stalled, in fact is in reverse, when things are so joyous for the poor.

I wonder why that might be?

Yes I wonder too. Perhaps you can explain why that might be.
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#7
Wealth generates income, or?
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#8
(01-13-2018, 07:36 PM)Pneumann Wrote: Wealth generates income, or?

Only if you hold your wealth in income generating assets, or you can access the income that assets create.

I'm impressed by your ability to look at a 'good thing' and try to see the downside. Perhaps you could call it irrational pessismism.
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#9
So, you're saying that your original parameter of income compressions between quintiles was at best flawed and at worst fallacious because it doesn't take into account one of the most acute measures of inequality?
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#10
No. I'm saying that the poorest quintile's income is rising faster than the highest.

That's neither flawed nor fallacious, but a FACT.
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