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Another reason to love your NHS
#1
If only we had an NHS here

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017...SApp_Other
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#2
"But the NHS came 10th on healthcare outcomes, a category that measures how successful treatment has been – a significant weakness that was also identified in 2014."
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#3
(07-14-2017, 10:33 AM)Protheroe Wrote: "But the NHS came 10th on healthcare outcomes, a category that measures how successful treatment has been – a significant weakness that was also identified in 2014."

If you accept the 80/20 rule, which I generally do. The NHS pisses it, for all its faults
"The best, the safest and most affordable healthcare system"
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#4
The Commonwealth Fund study is an outlier. The NHS can be as affordable and efficient as it likes. I'd rather it was top for outcomes personally, wouldn't you? Otherwise what's the point.

10th out of 11 on keeping people alive is appalling.
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#5
(07-14-2017, 12:11 PM)Protheroe Wrote: The Commonwealth Fund study is an outlier. The NHS can be as affordable and efficient as it likes. I'd rather it was top for outcomes personally, wouldn't you? Otherwise what's the point.

10th out of 11 on keeping people alive is appalling.

Then put more money into it matching GDP investment of other countries. If it's the most efficient but not first it's not being find enough.
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#6
No other nation funds their healthcare the way UK does. That's the first problem.
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#7
The NHS is the greatest invention this country has ever constructed.

But it is now being silently dismantled and sold off to for-profit-only companies under the shadow of outsourcing.

To return it to its once great position in the nation's heart we need to solve two major problems. The first is that the NHS is run now for the benefit of consultants. It must be returned to the patients. Secondly we need to know how to manage the massive improvements in medical technology which have given us all better life chances but at enormous cost from the pharmaceutical robbers.
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#8
(07-15-2017, 10:32 PM)Protheroe Wrote: No other nation funds their healthcare the way UK does. That's the first problem.

The UK isn't any other nation. The NHS has been a huge improvement on the compulsory health insurance system that it replaced, and that other European countries use. The healthcare system in this country affords opportunity of choice for private healthcare as well as a tax based safety net for those unable to afford it. Other countries that have compulsory insurance have natural monopolies form removing market competition, there is less interconnectivity making the services less efficient and there's just as much unnecessary middle management. We could fund it through tax to remove the burden from the low earners, but what will this improve? How will the private sector make the most efficient healthcare system in the world more efficient, considering that private healthcare is already less efficient.

As for why we are the only country with a nationalised health service, it's due to historical reforms caused by a perfect storm. No other country is in a position to nationalise their health services as we were in 1945. They don't have a lack of infrastructure, high ratio of high earners to low earners, high inflation and need for general sweeping welfare reforms. That said, through the creation of the NHS, many other countries followed our example of free to the point of care which they were able to do.
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#9
Well Proth can keep using Institute of Economic Affairs catchphrases and arguments but in Ireland we would prefer your system to ours
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#10
(07-16-2017, 09:06 AM)BoringBaggie Wrote:
(07-15-2017, 10:32 PM)Protheroe Wrote: No other nation funds their healthcare the way UK does. That's the first problem.

The UK isn't any other nation. The NHS has been a huge improvement on the compulsory health insurance system that it replaced, and that other European countries use. The healthcare system in this country affords opportunity of choice for private healthcare as well as a tax based safety net for those unable to afford it. Other countries that have compulsory insurance have natural monopolies form removing market competition, there is less interconnectivity making the services less efficient and there's just as much unnecessary middle management. We could fund it through tax to remove the burden from the low earners, but what will this improve? How will the private sector make the most efficient healthcare system in the world more efficient, considering that private healthcare is already less efficient.

A) It is funded from general taxation.

B) Like I said, efficiency doesn't matter if you're not very good at keeping people alive.
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