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Proths latest hero
#11
(09-12-2017, 01:12 PM)YProtheroe Wrote: Ludicrous beliefs?

I'd hazard a guess they're shared by the vast majority of Catholics, Muslims, Sikhs, Hindus etc.

Ludicrous? How very liberal of you Dekka.

Surely I don't have to agree or even respect a belief to accept others hold it? I'm not stopping anyone practising archaic and ludicrous doctrines neither am I seeking to represent them politically. I'd say   tolerating what I believe to be ludicrous beliefs is very liberal of me.
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#12
Then I don't think 'ludicrous' is the appropriate adjective for a liberal. Choose your words more carefully.
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#13
The ludicrous bit it claiming you have those principles because you are a Christian whilst simultaneously shafting the poor.
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#14
(09-12-2017, 11:04 AM)Protheroe Wrote:
(09-12-2017, 09:25 AM)Donegal Wrote: He also thought Leadsome would be a great leader of the party

I've asked you before to qualify where I've ever said that Donny.

I'm a huge fan of how Leadsom conducted herself with dignity during the Referendum campaign. And JRM. But leaders of the party? Hmm.

I'll take my shoeing quietly
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#15
(09-12-2017, 06:26 PM)Heath Wrote: The ludicrous bit it claiming you have those principles because you are a Christian whilst simultaneously shafting the poor.

Beautifully put in this letter to The Guardian:

 Jacob Rees-Mogg justifies his opposition to gay marriage and abortion even in cases of rape on the basis of his firmly held Christian beliefs (Report, 7 September). Fine. One can admire people with principles based on profound belief. So where is his opposition to welfare cuts on the grounds that Jesus went out of his way to demonstrate his compassion for the poor and the lame, the lepers and the prostitutes? When Jesus says “blessed are the peacemakers”, how does that fit with Rees-Mogg’s record of consistently voting for military intervention? Where are his statements on debates about executive pay, reminding other MPs that it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to get into heaven? I’m confused: I thought being a committed Christian meant following the teachings and actions of Jesus, rather than standing at the pick-and-mix counter in a sweetshop, only choosing the fizzy snakes.
Iain Rowan
Sunderland
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#16
(09-13-2017, 07:52 AM)Zoltanger Wrote:
(09-12-2017, 06:26 PM)Heath Wrote: The ludicrous bit it claiming you have those principles because you are a Christian whilst simultaneously shafting the poor.

Beautifully put in this letter to The Guardian:

 Jacob Rees-Mogg justifies his opposition to gay marriage and abortion even in cases of rape on the basis of his firmly held Christian beliefs (Report, 7 September). Fine. One can admire people with principles based on profound belief. So where is his opposition to welfare cuts on the grounds that Jesus went out of his way to demonstrate his compassion for the poor and the lame, the lepers and the prostitutes? When Jesus says “blessed are the peacemakers”, how does that fit with Rees-Mogg’s record of consistently voting for military intervention? Where are his statements on debates about executive pay, reminding other MPs that it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to get into heaven? I’m confused: I thought being a committed Christian meant following the teachings and actions of Jesus, rather than standing at the pick-and-mix counter in a sweetshop, only choosing the fizzy snakes.
Iain Rowan
Sunderland

Since when did the Catholic Church and teachings of Jesus have anything in common?
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#17
(09-12-2017, 06:26 PM)Heath Wrote: The ludicrous bit it claiming you have those principles because you are a Christian whilst simultaneously shafting the poor.

It's your opinion that he's shafting the poor. You're entitled to it.

I doubt he shares it. Neither do I.
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#18
I actually don't care he holds those beliefs, past me thinking he can't be very bright, adults wuth imaginary friends aren't. However my issue is when those beliefs become policies.
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#19
(09-13-2017, 11:34 AM)Birdman1811 Wrote: However my issue is when those beliefs become policies.

The chances of that are zero, so don't have nightmares.
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#20
(09-13-2017, 12:07 PM)Protheroe Wrote:
(09-13-2017, 11:34 AM)Birdman1811 Wrote: However my issue is when those beliefs become policies.

The chances of that are zero, so don't have nightmares.

His voting record really doesn't fill me with confidence in that respect at all, Catholic church ahead of civil liberties. There are plenty of Tories from the liberal wing that I wouldn't mind, Mogg is not on that list.
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